Panhandle residents" views of high-level nuclear waste storage
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Panhandle residents" views of high-level nuclear waste storage

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Published by Dept. of Agriculture in Austin, TX (P.O. Box 12847, Austin 78711) .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Texas,
  • Texas Panhandle,
  • United States

Subjects:

  • Radioactive waste sites -- Texas -- Texas Panhandle -- Citizen participation.,
  • Radioactive waste sites -- United States -- Government policy.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementJulie Brody, project director.
ContributionsTexas. Dept. of Agriculture. Office of Natural Resources., Texas. Dept. of Agriculture. Office of Research and Policy Planning.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsTD898 .B75 1985
The Physical Object
Paginationv, 108 p. :
Number of Pages108
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2667594M
LC Control Number85622546

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Page 32 - Germany is testing the suitability of a salt formation near the town of Gorleben as a deep geologic repository for high-level waste. If the site proves satisfactory, Germany plans to begin depositing high-level waste for final disposal in However, Germany has faced considerable opposition to its nuclear power and waste facilities. On‐Site Storage of High Level Nuclear Waste: Attitudes and Perceptions of Local Residents Gilbert W. Bassett Jr. Department of Economics (m\c), University of Illinois at Chicago, S. Morgan St., Rm. , Chicago, Illinois ‐ (e‐mail:[email protected]).Cited by: @article{osti_, title = {Geology and geohydrology of the Palo Duro Basin, Texas Panhandle. Report on the progress of nuclear waste isolation feasibility studies, }, author = {Gustavson, T. C. and Presley, M. W. and Handford, C. R. and Finley, R. J. and Dutton, S. P. and Baumgardner, Jr., R. W. and McGillis, K. A. and Simpkins, W. W.}, abstractNote = {Since early , the Bureau of. No public policy issue has been as difficult as high-level nuclear waste. Debates continue regarding Yucca Mountain as a disposal site, and-more generally-the appropriateness of geologic disposal and the need to act quickly. Previous research has focused on possible social, political, and economic consequences of a facility in Nevada. Impacts have been predicted to be potentially large and to.

Historical Manuscripts Home Alphabetical List of All Collections | Collections Listed By Subject: Collection Title: Nuclear Waste Disposal Research Collection Collection Number: M Dates: ca. Volume: cu. ft. Provenance: The collection was donated by Mrs. Carolyn Blackman in August It was transferred to the Archives from the Mississippiana Collection by Jennifer Brannock. On-Site Storage of High Level Nuclear Waste: Attitudes and Perceptions of Local Residents Gilbert W. Bassett Jr.,' Hank C. Jenkins-Smith: and Carol Silva2 Received Septem ; revised January No public policy issue has been as difficult as high-level nuclear waste.   High level nuclear waste storage site application sparks debate. Waste Control Specialists has applied to st tons of spent fuel rods in Andrews County. Author: Dana Morris.   The search for a storage site for the UK's high-level nuclear waste is likely to go ahead in Cumbria after an opinion poll shows residents are in favour.

The particular siting dilemma considered in this book is the problem of how to "dispose" of the high-level nuclear wastes accumulating at nuclear power plants in the United States. These wastes, in the form of "spent" fuel rods, will emit dangerous levels of radioactivity for thousands of years - anywhere betw and , years. Nuclear waste is also a type of nuclear waste created by the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (e.g. waste formed by vitrification of liquid high-level waste). But in this case, the term high-level waste is preferred instead of nuclear waste. It must be noted, we have to distinguish between nuclear waste and radioactive waste.   Yucca Mountain, the project to permanently store high-level nuclear waste underground in southern Nevada, has been considered dead since then-President Obama defunded it in   The residents are afraid their towns will become home to the permanent storage site for low-level radioactive waste that New York must build within the next few years.